I am not a politically-savvy person. However, I have convictions and vote from those. One of those convictions is to tell the truth and not to slander. I found some very interesting posts today that I think need to be shared. I don’t plan on this being a political site, but I do want to inform of heinous slander and lying when it is this obvious.

1. Michael Moore, director of controversial 9/11, owns a lot of Haliburton stock. A lot! He was the fellow who was on vendetta to vilify Haliburton…Michael Moore owns Haliburton stock! HT:Woodchips

2. Democrats who thought it would have been wise to disarm Iraq’s WMD Program. That’s right, George Bush and the Republicans weren’t the first and only to think we should do so. HT:Powerline

3. a la Powerline: “The fact is that the intelligence agencies’ official consensus estimate expressed a high level of confidence that Saddam possessed both chemical and biological weapons. The U.N. didn’t disagree, contrary to popular assumptions and Hans Blix’s revisionist history. As we have noted here before, the U.N.’s UNMOVIC reports emphasized the large quantities of banned materials for which Iraq had failed to account.”

Just wanted you to know…By the way, I am not saying that there are no lying Republicans, but these are pretty ironic on my levels. As I said, with all the stir that happened as a result of these blasts, I thought it helpful to bring some balance to the charges.

I am reading this article by Greg Koukl at Stand to Reason to get a better understanding of how and where the Kingdom of God intersects the kingdom of man.

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God’s Broad Shoulders

One of the fascinating aspects of my profession is that I come in contact with a lot of Christians who want to engage with their faith in a deep way. Rather than being content with showing up on Sunday or being CINO (Christian In Name Only), these folks want to understand the Bible better and tease out the implications for their lives.

On the flipside of this, many of these same people are afraid to engage with their doubts in a deep way. It’s almost as if, doubts and questions are treated from a distance–“I don’t struggle with this, but…”

The biggest breakthrough in my own journey of faith came through (and continues to come through) engaging my doubts and questions as my own. They are not theoretical. They are honest struggles: problem of evil is the perennial one. I was in the throes of one of these bouts several years ago when a friend told me, “God can handle your doubts.”

I have used this same bit of advice for my struggling friends and self. If truth is not relative. If God is truth. Your doubts and questions will not overthrow this objective, transcendent truth. It’s not as though you are the first to struggle with doubts and fears and pain. The heavens will not collapse under the weight of your doubts. You won’t come up with a question that will cause God to close up shop. You can honestly engage with your doubts and fears and pain and suffering without having to be quick to give the typical and trite answers to matters of faith.

Go ahead, roll your burdens on God. He’s got broad shoulders.

Blow the Roof Off

Reading through Os Guiness’ new book, Fool’s Talk, for an Honors Seminar I’m leading on the art of persuasion. It is EXCELLENT.

I find that too many apologists take the defensive in explaining the Christian worldview. That has a place, but I would recommend that after you listen and listen and listen some more to the person you are engaging in dialogue, that you take the offensive. Of course, this is not being offensive, but taking the offense in showing the foolishness of the worldview. At some point the team has to score. If they only have defense, they will not score (okay, for the nay-sayers, the defense can score on a take-away…but even then there was an aggression to get the ball and not merely to prevent…BTW, prevent defense is such a great way to lose a ballgame, isn’t it?).

Here’s a juicy quote that I have underlined in the book:

From Jesus onward, the dynamic is crystal clear in Christian proclamation. “The tree is known by its fruit,” Jesus said–not by its seed (Mt. 12.33). If you had tried to persuade the prodigal son to return home the day he left home, would he have listened? If you had spoken to him the day he hit the pigsty, would you have needed to persuade him? Always “see where it leads to,” St. Augustine advised when dealing with false ideas. Follow it out to the “absolutely ruddy end,” C. S. Lewis remarked with characteristic Englishness. “Push them to the logic of their presuppositions,” Francis Schaeffer used to say. Too many varieties of unbelief are halfway houses. Too many unbelievers have not had the courage or the consistency to follow their thoughts all the way home –Fool’s Talk, p.118 (emphasis added)

Returning

Return ArrowLike a long, boring letter or conversation, there’s a tendency to tune out. I pray I haven’t bored you by my long silence. Life has been full of many winding turns over the last year and I am just now getting my feet under me. I am re-thinking and re-tooling my blogging and writing.

I would like for you to enter the conversation and be a part of this part process blog, part resourcing blog, part rumination blog. Would you help me by sending me questions or topics you’d like me to deal with? You can send me an email or make a comment on this post.

I wait. . .